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Speciation: Unprecedented number of hybrid sharks

In “Scientists: Dozens of hybrid sharks found off Australia” (CNN Light Years, January 2nd, 2012), Brad Lendon reports,

Australian researchers say they’ve found 57 animals that are a cross between the Australian blacktip shark and the common blacktip shark, two closely related but genetically distinct species.

Ovenden said the discovery is a first for sharks, and it could indicate that other shark and ray species may interbreed in reaction to climate change.

“Wild hybrids are usually hard to find, so detecting hybrids and their offspring is extraordinary. To find 57 hybrids along 2,000 kilometers of coastline is unprecedented,” Ovenden said.

And it raises questions that Darwin decency forbids us to pursue, right?

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4 Responses to Speciation: Unprecedented number of hybrid sharks

  1. Well it looks like they aren’t genetically distinct species. :roll: :razz:

  2. I can’t get enough of this. Evolution results in new species so distinct that they can’t even tell each other apart, and the only way we can tell is to catch one and do a DNA test.

    That’s a thought for anyone who frequents singles bars.

    The important thing to remember is that this same process by which sharks evolve into virtually indistinguishable sharks and gulls with grey wings evolve into gulls with black wings can also, given time, produce whales from rodents and penguins from dinosaurs, produce lungs where there were gills, and, whatever. Everything else.

    If that sounds odd, remember that it’s up to you to show what barriers prevent it. That’s. How. Science. Works.

  3. If that sounds odd, remember that it’s up to you to show what barriers prevent it. That’s. How. Science. Works.

    It’s up to you to show something! That’s how science works. Take any cladogram and draw a circle round that subclade within which population-genetic evolution is a viable explanation for diversity, distinguished from sister groups between which it isn’t, and explain why.

  4. I can take a cladogram and use it to ferret out a common design.

    And BTW ID is not anti-evolution.

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