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Science is probably more fun as a work in progress anyway …

From Physorg:

July 20, 2009:

“California’s Channel Islands hold evidence of Clovis-age comets”

A 17-member team has found what may be the smoking gun of a much-debated proposal that a cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago ripped through North America and drove multiple species into extinction.

June 17, 2010:

“Comet cause for climate change theory dealt blow by fungus”

A team of scientists – led by Professor Andrew C Scott of the Department of Earth Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London – have revealed that neither comet nor catastrophe were the cause for abrupt climate change some 12,900 years ago.

August 30, 2010:

“Impact hypothesis loses its sparkle”

Shock-synthesized diamonds said to prove a catastrophic impact killed off North American megafauna can’t be found.

March 5, 2012:

“Study supports theory of extraterrestrial impact”

A 16-member international team of researchers that includes James Kennett, professor of earth science at UC Santa Barbara, has identified a nearly 13,000-year-old layer of thin, dark sediment buried in the floor of Lake Cuitzeo in central Mexico. The sediment layer contains an exotic assemblage of materials, including nanodiamonds, impact spherules, and more, which, according to the researchers, are the result of a cosmic body impacting Earth.

April 23, 2012:

“New evidence argues against prehistoric extraterrestrial impact event”

Evidence used to support a possible extraterrestrial impact event is likely the result of natural processes, according to a new collaborative study led by U.S. Geological Survey scientists.

If the Darwin in the schools lobby gets on this bandwagon with their customary dogmatic certainty, students will need a universal swivel joint in their heads.

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