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How to Bring Healing and How Not To

In our final video for the Engineering and Metaphysics conference, we have Dr. Walter Bradley, famous in ID circles for his book, The Mystery of Life’s Origin. Here Dr. Bradley shares with us his work on helping relieve poverty in third-world countries through engineering. He also tells us about practices that people attempt to use to relieve poverty which are unhelpful. This is a great summary of the practices that work and the practices that don’t work.

If you have trouble with this, you can see it at the following URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X92BDBku6g4

I hope you enjoyed the Engineering and Metaphysics conference! It was great to get to know everyone, and to get to spend time talking about these things with everyone. I hope that if you missed this conference that you will join us for the next one!

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3 Responses to How to Bring Healing and How Not To

  1. Hey thanks for this JohnnyB. Sorry I could join you all this time around in Oklahoma.

    I thought of you at the Origins 2012 conference. Btw, you got your name mentioned now in an evolutionary biology journal! See my post on the Origins 2012 conference. Well done and congratulations!

  2. JB:

    Very interesting indeed.

    Can we get the PPT?

    Also, maybe the FAME Biodiesel cannot be made in villages, but what about in nodal towns that are likely to have better engineering resources and transport nets? Ordinary fuel probably moves like that already.

    (I know, costs will be higher. But, I am not thinking 100% commercial here, a boost to villages sustained project fed by spun offs from things that pay in the market? And, going back to WWII, one of the key innovations that moved the blitzkrieg was the 20 l “Jerrican” that was a tough enough, sealed man-handling friendly fuel unit. And gasoline is every inch as explosive and toxic as methanol. A polymer version of the Jerrican could probably do the job. Though of course methanol is a fairly aggressive solvent?)

    Maybe someone else has ideas.

    Fuel from agri wastes would make a big difference, e.g. bagasse — the fibres from sugar cane. (If someone can figure out effective digestion systems, maybe building on Mark Holtzapple of TAMU and the mixed alcohol process. Isn’t that “next door” to Dr Bradley? Or was this tried and ran into roadblocks?)

    Thoughts, anyone?

    KF

  3. PS: The Jerrican, here, cf here on plastic versions, and here on some history — not sure of the “originally American” claim. notice the summary here about reverse engineering inferior products (and from the previous, the resistance in Britain to the superior one). H’mm, I just may have an iconic story for innovation here!

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