Home » News » Registration Now Open For 2013 Summer Seminar on Intelligent Design

Registration Now Open For 2013 Summer Seminar on Intelligent Design

From here.

The Center for Science and Culture at Discovery Institute announces two intensive 9-day seminars for college students during the summer of 2013.

The CSC Seminar on Intelligent Design in the Natural Sciences will prepare students to make research contributions advancing the growing science of intelligent design (ID). The seminar will explore cutting-edge ID work in fields such as molecular biology, biochemistry, embryology, developmental biology, paleontology, computational biology, ID-theoretic mathematics, cosmology, physics, and the history and philosophy of science. This seminar is open to students who intend to pursue graduate studies in the natural sciences or the philosophy of science. Applicants must be college juniors or seniors or already in graduate school. Details and registration information.

The C.S. Lewis Fellows Program on Science and Society will explore the growing impact of science on politics, economics, social policy, bioethics, theology, and the arts. The program is named after celebrated British writer C.S. Lewis, a perceptive critic of both scientism and technocracy in books such as The Abolition of Man and That Hideous Strength. This seminar is open to college/university students who intend careers in the social sciences, humanities, law, or theology. Details and registration information.

As an alumni of the summer seminar, I highly recommend this program. Spending nine days in Seattle, with all expenses covered, interacting with leading lights in the intelligent design movement such as William Dembski, Stephen Meyer, Michael Behe, Richard Sternberg, Jonathan Wells, Paul Nelson, and Jay Richards — what more could one want? Hope to see you there!

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10 Responses to Registration Now Open For 2013 Summer Seminar on Intelligent Design

  1. OT: The Majority of Animal Genes Are Required for Wild-Type Fitness. Cell. – Ramani, A. K. et al. 2012. – 148 (4): 792-802.
    Excerpt: Whereas previous studies typically assess phenotypes that are detectable by eye after a single generation, we monitored growth quantitatively over several generations. In contrast to previous estimates, we find that, in these multigeneration population assays, the majority of genes affect fitness, and this suggests that genetic networks are not robust to mutation. Our results demonstrate that, in a single environmental condition, most animal genes play essential roles. This is a higher proportion than for yeast genes, and we suggest that the source of negative selection is different in animals and in unicellular eukaryotes.
    http://www.cell.com/abstract/S.....%2900084-0
    http://www.icr.org/article/7166/

  2. I can’t wait for the next Gregory! Maybe it will be me!

  3. I sure hope Casey Luskin isn’t teach PoS though!

  4. make research contributions advancing the growing science of intelligent design

    !

  5. Why’s that, Mung?

  6. News,

    lol, don’t mind me. I am making reference to snide remarks made by Gregory about Casey’s lack of qualifications to teach anyone anything about the Philosophy of Science.

    Some readers will understand the reference. ;)

    It’s tongue in cheek, not meant as disrespectful towards Casey.

  7. Don’t worry, News. Mung is just jealous and has not studied PoS either.

    What year alumnus of the summer program are you? I’m from 2008. But that was back when they talked about “ID in the Humanities and Social Sciences,” a program which was discontinued. It would be problematic to speak about why that happened here, but be welcome to contact me privately if you’d like to learn why design by intelligent human agents is no longer (if it ever was!) a preferred language of the DI.

    The program was enjoyable and the hosts genuine and generous. Will it be held at Pacific Lutheran University again?

  8. Gregory – if ID and human agency is no longer of interest to the DI, rest assured it still is of interest here!

  9. Thanks johnnyb. Yes, I do remember it is of interest to you, like creativity and creation. To ‘here,’ it is not so clear. But then again, sociologists are the ones who are supposed to speak reflexively for/about communities as a professional duty, while others do it ‘subjectively’ through participation and belonging. There are many people at UD who seem stubbornly intent to promote ‘objectivistic’ natural scientific ID, which has no more connection with our humanity than theology or philosophy would allow. The Summer Program is a good opportunity to meet young people who are exploring options and who approach ID critically and curiously. One easily realises there the normality of inquiring with questions involving science, philosophy and theology/worldview without the shadow of atheism, materialism or nihilism stalking over their shoulder.

  10. There are many people at UD who seem stubbornly intent to promote ‘objectivistic’ natural scientific ID, which has no more connection with our humanity than theology or philosophy would allow.

    Yea, and the theory of gravity has little connection with our humanity. You’re just trying to take the idea of biological intelligent design and suit it for your own ends.

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