Home » Mind, News » People who think they have a soul eat less healthy diets than those who don’t?

People who think they have a soul eat less healthy diets than those who don’t?

From “Mind vs. Body? Dualist Beliefs Linked with Less Concern for Healthy Behaviors” (Association for Psychological Science, July 24, 2012), we learn,

Across five related studies, researchers Matthias Forstmann, Pascal Burgmer, and Thomas Mussweiler of the University of Cologne, Germany, found that people primed with dualist beliefs had more reckless attitudes toward health and exercise, and also preferred (and ate) a less healthy diet than those who were primed with physicalist beliefs.

That’s funny, because religion and spirituality are usually associated with better health outcomes. Proof of miracles? We can have our cake and eat it too? Or … oh wait, isn’t Psychological Science on the bunk detection list? Despite which …

How be this: Eat like it’s the only body in this life yer ever gonna have. Ain’t no other body on the shelf for youse.

And this is yer last religion jaw fer the week.

Hat tip: Stephanie West Allan at Brains on Purpose

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7 Responses to People who think they have a soul eat less healthy diets than those who don’t?

  1. News you haven’t said anything. While it may be true that spiritual people usually have healthy outcomes, what does that have to do with this research. Some things could be unhealthy right? The problem I have with the article itself is how in the world are these things related? Who cares if you have a soul or not, I’m going to eat healthy either way otherwise ill die

  2. The most interesting conclusion is not that ‘you can have your cake and eat it, too’ (interesting as that may be) but that “healthy diet” advice is a bunch of bunk. One should tune in and pay attention to their own natural feedbacks rather than listen to health experts. Remember when margarine was “healthy” and butter “unhealthy” according to health authorities (scientists, pharma, doctors, schools, media)? Now the official wisdom is that it’s exactly the opposite, or at least that margarine is bad for you. That’s something your taste buds and your stomach could have told you right away if you cared to listen.

  3. Knowing that our true home is in heaven and we are merely exiled here, since my wife died in May, I’ve changed from eating healthy organic meals to microwaved, processed-food dishes. So, yes, I can see why our faith would make us more accepting of death, or what passes for it.

  4. For Jah, we will die anyway. The reason for healthy eating is not to prevent death but to prevent chronic ill health and related bad outcomes during one’s life. It’s very worthwhile. The risk, however, is getting caught up in food fad nonsense that gives the appearance of concern about health but is basically just one scare to the next.

  5. Axel, sincere condolences. One wonders whether your wife is praying in heaven that you will think of eating better. You don’t know when you will see her again, and in the meantime, it will make life easier for you.

  6. Yes, nightlight, that is a huge problem. Not only do some of us remember when margarine was good, we remember when it was evil. Before it became evil again recently. Back to when the Canadian province of Quebec dyed it GREEN so people wouldn’t want it.

    Margarine was bad for the dairy industry. Save Bossy the cow’s job …

    Saskatchewan province (Canada) sold margarine uncoloured, only. At least one member of the UD news team had – as her earliest childhood task – to soften up the margarine with the colouring fluid, hard to do on a chilly morning when the stuff was rock hard itself. But Mom was busy with other tasks.

    Child labour, ya know. Call da police. ;)

    Okay, so then margarine became good and butter bad, and we had no explanation for our many Saskatchewan centenarians who were raised on butter and other – now forbidden – foods.

    Finally, some of us decided, just eat lots of whole grains, fruit, vegetables, meat, dairy, and get PLENTY of exercise like they did, and give lots to charity and pray a lot and don’t worry too much, and if that doesn’t work, nothing else will.

  7. Axel: My condolences. God grant you grace as you work through your grief. News is spot on on the healthy lifestyle counsel. Look for good fruit, nuts and veggies as close to raw as is reasonable. I suspect the Chinese stir-cook approach is worth a look — but understand the traditional pans work better than look-alikes as nicks hammered in sides allow food to be bunched up there during fast cooking. Check someone who knows. Olive oil has a good rep, as does coconut. Corn or Canola or sunflower? Not sure on peanut oil, but peanuts have an allergenic rep. My folks swear by porridge — try out their trick of blending Oats, Corn and cream of wheat, then top off with sliced/diced fruit. Multigrain bread and similar crackers. If you are a bit of a mouse like me try for low fat cheeses. And of course scripture, prayer, good music and a light heart, with friends & fellowship. Hey, one form of neglected prayer is reflective conference with God: lay out your issues, plans, decisions & challenges, opening to God one by one. Ask for counsel, and take impressions, counsel by others, having your steps fall in place “suspiciously” etc seriously as potential guidance to be confirmed via scripture, sound ethics, wisdom and confidential counsel. (If it had not been for a miracle of guidance to the right doctor, I would not be here, these 40 or so years now. After that one, don’t ask me to disbelieve in God!!!) Feel free to drop me a line, click my handle then follow the contact link top of the page. God be with you. KF

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