Home » Intelligent Design » See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil

See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil

Just as Charles Darwin dealt with difficulties with his theory of evolution in Chapter 6 of Origins, so too Denis Alexander deals with objections in Chapter 6 of his book Creation or Evolution. And just as Darwin’s logic was often questionable, so too is Alexander’s. The chief problem is Alexander’s rather selective presentation. For an author of a book about the origins controversy, Alexander seems to be remarkably unaware of the actual debate.  Read more

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2 Responses to See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil

  1. From the blog

    But there are myriad barriers that ensure skeptics are filtered out at every stage. Everything from passing grades and letters of recommendation to tenure and funding are strongly contingent on conformity. Dissenters are blacklisted so they never have a chance to raise objections.

    But you work at a University where, according to Wikipedia

    As a final guarantee of strict adherence to its theological and cultural worldview, the University requires every faculty member, when first hired and again upon application for tenure, to submit their understanding of and complete agreement with each item of the doctrinal and teaching statements to the Talbot School of Theology for evaluation.

    Is that incorrect ? If it is correct then what’s the difference between that University’s enforcement of compliance and the alleged enforcement of compliance elsewhere ?

    Or are we just discussing work standards ?

  2. 2
    Cornelius Hunter

    paulbaird:

    what’s the difference between that University’s enforcement of compliance and the alleged enforcement of compliance elsewhere?

    There’s no comparison. I don’t exhort or require skeptics to join Biola. If someone wants to raise an objection, I don’t marginalize them in a Catch-22.

    Beyond that, there are other differences, though not relevant to your specific question, yet worth noting. For instance, Biola does not use public funding for the promotion of religious ideas in science. Biola does not falsely claim religious neutrality. And Biola is above board with their requirements.

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