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Physicist Sean Carroll’s book on Higgs boson wins Royal Society Winton Prize

  Here:

Congratulations to my friend and colleague Sean Carroll, blogger at Preposterous Universe! For his book, The Particle at the End of the Universe, about the theoretical idea and experimental discovery of the Higgs field and its particle (the Higgs ‘boson’), he has won the 2013 Royal Society Winton Prize!

Carroll wrote a piece here a while back, ”No God Needed“. He has become a convert to the multiverse.

Vince Torley responds to his overall argument here (“Is God a good theory—a response”).

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One Response to Physicist Sean Carroll’s book on Higgs boson wins Royal Society Winton Prize

  1. The Era of Neutrino Astronomy Has Begun – Nov. 21, 2013
    Excerpt: “The era of neutrino astronomy has begun,” Sullivan said as the IceCube Collaboration announced the observation of 28 very high-energy particle events that constitute the first solid evidence for astrophysical neutrinos from cosmic sources.,,
    Billions of them pass through our bodies unnoticed every second. These extremely high-energy particles maintain their speed and direction unaffected by magnetic fields.,,,
    IceCube is made up of 5,160 digital optical modules suspended along 86 strings embedded in ice beneath the South Pole. The National Science Foundation-supported observatory detects neutrinos through the tiny flashes of blue light, called Cherenkov light, produced when neutrinos interact in the ice. Computers at the IceCube laboratory collect near-real-time data from the optical sensors and send information about interesting events north via satellite. The UMD team designed the data collection system and much of IceCube’s analytic software. Construction took nearly a decade, and the completed detector began gathering data in May 2011.
    “IceCube is a wonderful and unique astrophysical telescope — it is deployed deep in the Antarctic ice but looks over the entire Universe, detecting neutrinos coming through the Earth from the northern skies, as well as from around the southern skies,” said Vladimir Papitashvili of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Polar Programs.
    In April 2012 IceCube detected two high-energy events above 1 petaelectronvolt (PeV), nicknamed Bert and Ernie, the first astrophysical neutrinos definitively recorded by a terrestrial detector. After Bert and Ernie were discovered, the IceCube team searched their records from May 2010 to May 2012 of events that fell slightly below the energy level of their original search. They discovered 26 more high-energy events, all at levels of 30 teraelectronvolts (TeV) or higher, indicative of astrophysical neutrinos. Preliminary results of this analysis were presented May 15 at the IceCube Particle Astrophysics Symposium at UW-Madison. The analysis presented in Science reveals a highly statistically significant signal (more than 4 sigma), providing solid evidence that IceCube has successfully detected high-energy extraterrestrial neutrinos, said UMD’s Sullivan
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/re.....142259.htm

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