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New at The Best Schools I

Study: Teen recovery from substance abuse includes increase in spirituality. Note that this is correlation, not causation. The researchers are not saying that just getting into spirituality will help a teen recover from substance abuse. But neither is it true that it doesn’t matter what one believes.

Was teaching assistant Margaret Voyko simply wronged? Is there more to the story? The Catholic university should have treated her better, but she was difficult to assist.

How seriously should we take brain-based learning in schools? It’s worth noting that the approach of the conference is apt to be materialistic, in the sense of making no distinction between the mind and the brain. If you think that these are messages children need to hear, then you will probably like this conference.

A handy resource for learning (and teaching) science media literacy. Science teachers: Have you ever had a student come running up to tell you about a science news story headlined: Researcher: I am pretty sure there is life on that planet! Or, much more difficult, “Study shows dramatic improvement in ovarian cancer,”—and the student’s mother has it.

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2 Responses to New at The Best Schools I

  1. There seems to be a significant concordance between the interior life of the devout Christian, and the self-denial, faith and hope of the recovering alcoholic, as he or she tries to live one day at a time, the matrix of Jean-Pierre de Caussade’s Sacrament of the Present Moment.

    Or is it the other way around, practically? Living one day at a time following the sacramental taking of each moment at a time for the greater glory of God, however mundane and trivial-seeming the task most appropriately addressed at that moment?

  2. OT: Here is a new paradox from quantum mechanics that is humorously inexplicable to the atheist’s materialistic worldview.

    Physicists add ‘quantum Cheshire Cats’ to list of quantum paradoxes – November 25, 2013
    Given all the weird things that can occur in quantum mechanics—from entanglement to superposition to teleportation—not much seems surprising in the quantum world. Nevertheless, a new finding that an object’s physical properties can be disembodied from the object itself is not something we’re used to seeing on an everyday basis. In a new paper, physicists have theoretically shown that this phenomenon, which they call a quantum Cheshire Cat, is an inherent feature of quantum mechanics,,,
    The physicists begin their paper with an excerpt from Lewis Carroll’s 1865 novel Alice in Wonderland:
    ‘All right’, said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end
    of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had
    gone.
    ‘Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin’, thought Alice, ‘but a grin without a cat!
    It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!’
    Just as the grin is a property of a cat, polarization is a property of a photon. In their paper, the physicists explain how, “in the curious way of quantum mechanics, photon polarization may exist where there is no photon at all.”
    ,,,when the photon’s location and polarization are measured simultaneously, the results are identical to those of the original experiment: the photon is in the left arm while the polarization is in the right arm.
    http://phys.org/news/2013-11-p.....doxes.html

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