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Telic Thoughts: Ancestral carbon mechanism points to design

In “Early life was prepared to evolve” (Telic Thoughts, April 26, 2012), chunkdz notes

Systems biologists have discovered the ancestral mechanism of carbon fixation. This is the most basic cornerstone of life – no fixed carbon, no life. A few things to take note of:

•This ancestral mechanism diverged into the six modern mechanisms.

•The divergences in mechanisms relate to key branching events in evolutionary development.

•The ancestral mechanism was robust, redundant, multi-layered, and poised to exploit future environmental changes such as increased oxygen levels.

Viewed under the mindset of abiogenesis, biologists see this picture of early life as klunky, unrefined and highly unstable. As researcher Eric Smith says, “It seems likely that the earliest cells were rickety assemblies whose parts were constantly malfunctioning and breaking down”.

But if we instead view this under the mindset of design, we actually see some very ingenious design principles at work. Mainly, this is an amazingly adaptive system. Check it out: More.

There is no reason to think that “the earliest cells were rickety assemblies whose parts were constantly malfunctioning and breaking down.”If so, the project would have ended.

That’s just Darwin spouting from the grave.

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2 Responses to Telic Thoughts: Ancestral carbon mechanism points to design

  1. Persistence is perhaps the hardest bit to explain away with abiogenetic models. What made dissipative systems dynamically stable? The only empirically warranted answer appears to be choice contingency.

  2. Viewed under the mindset of abiogenesis, biologists see this picture of early life as klunky, unrefined and highly unstable. As researcher Eric Smith says, “It seems likely that the earliest cells were rickety assemblies whose parts were constantly malfunctioning and breaking down”.

    I don’t know who is Eric Smith. But that picture seems highly unlikely to me. If early cells were that fragile, they would have gone extinct before there was a chance of modern biological organisms emerging.

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