Home » Biology » Coffee? At this time of night? Psst!! Soon lab mice may be out of work, because …

Coffee? At this time of night? Psst!! Soon lab mice may be out of work, because …

Hannah Waters reports at The Scientist (14th February 2011),

The mouse is not enough

Early embryonic development differs between mice and cows, suggesting mice may not reflect mammalian development as well as scientists had believed

[ ... ]

Specifically, the mechanism of cell commitment in early embryos differs between mice and cows, suggesting that development in mice may not be representative of development in other mammals, including humans.

This research suggests “that the mouse alone is not the ideal model if you want to study mammalian embryogenesis,” said Michael Bader, a cardiovascular biologist who works on rat embryogenesis at the Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin and was not involved in the research.

Reminds me of the wheeze about the rats flopped in an alley: One explains to the other “I used to work in biomedical research but they fired me because I never got sick the way they expected.”

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • RSS Feed

3 Responses to Coffee? At this time of night? Psst!! Soon lab mice may be out of work, because …

  1. Along that line, Casey Luskin recently did a audio podcast showing how marsupial embryonic development severely compromises the argument for common ancestry:

    Marsupial Embryos Challenge Common Ancestry – Casey Luskin – audio podcast
    http://intelligentdesign.podom.....3_21-08_00

  2. I like this comment from the article:

    The mouse is not enough
    Rxcerpt: This study highlights the need to study development in multiple organisms, Richard Behringer, who studies mammalian embryogenesis at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas and was not involved in the research, said in an email. “There is no ‘correct’ system. Each species is unique and uses its own tailored mechanisms to achieve development. By only studying one species (eg, the mouse), naive scientists believe that it represents all mammals.”
    http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/57986/

  3. There does not appear to be enough information in the DNA to determine not only the type of cells to be made but also how many are to be made and where they are to go to connect with other cells. Is there any research in this area of embryogenesis?

Leave a Reply