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Atheist Anti-God Ad Campaign in England

Our good friend Richard Dawkins is on the march once again:

The sides of some of London’s red buses will soon carry ads asserting there is “probably no God,” as nonbelievers fight what they say is the preferential treatment given to religion in British society.

Organizers of a campaign to raise funds for the ads said Wednesday they received more than $113,000 in donations, almost seven times their target, in the hours since they launched the project on a charity Web site. Supporters include Oxford University biologist Richard Dawkins, who donated $9,000.

The money will be used to place posters on 30 buses carrying the slogan “There’s probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.” [Says Dawkins]: “This campaign to put alternative slogans on London buses will make people think — and thinking is anathema to religion.”

The religious think tank Theos said it had donated $82 to the campaign, on the grounds that the ads were so bad they would probably attract people to religion. “Stunts like this demonstrate how militant atheists are often great adverts for Christianity.”

See the full article for more enlightenment.

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20 Responses to Atheist Anti-God Ad Campaign in England

  1. Wow that is just so profound. There “probably” is no God. My head hurts.

  2. I hope they raise alot of money and by all the slogans from a church because this rediculous effort is going to change nothing.

  3. This is wrong:

    “There’s probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.”

    Quote Unquote “Enjoying Life” turned out to be a living hell for me and the only way I could find any meaning and “Enjoyment” in this life was to try to live the “good” life God had originally purposed for me.

  4. This campaign to put alternative slogans on London buses will make people think

    Is “Haw-Haw” Dawkins implying Brits don’t think so he has to put signs on buses to get them to do so?

    If I were a Brit I think I would take offense at this assumption that, until now, I was a thoughtless dummy. How generous of Dawkins to be the savior of the unthinking British people.

    —and thinking is anathema to religion

    If anyone isn’t thinking it’s Dawkins. What a stoopid statement to make by one touted as “brilliant”.

  5. Suggestion from an American feminist to the British humanists:

    If He is God, then Who is She?

  6. 6

    The religious think tank Theos said it had donated $82 to the campaign, on the grounds that the ads were so bad they would probably attract people to religion. “Stunts like this demonstrate how militant atheists are often great adverts for Christianity.”

    Bwhahahahaha

  7. 7

    Bluddy atheists, always fleecing the poor sheeple for money.

  8. “There is probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.”

    If there is “probably” no God, that means there is a slim chance there is, with eternal ramifications.

    How am I supposed to stop worrying and enjoy my life if there’s a chance I’ll be thrown into hell for eternity (eternity has no end…)?

  9. I can only assume that some of those who control the commanding heights of culture support Dawkins and have taken him under wing.
    Because incidents like these give some insight into how quickly he would be laughed of the public stage were he to stand on his own merits. :-)

  10. I think a more appropriate ad would be: “We’re reasonably sure there isn’t a hell. Why not take a chance?” A bit like Pascal in reverse.

    I think endeavours like this reveal the fundamental misunderstanding that these atheists seem to have, namely, that the religious are really unhappy and wish that this God guy would stop cramping their style. The reality is that – for a huge number of people – God is the cause of happiness, not an impediment to it.

  11. I’m sure “happiness” is not on their list of priorities. Last time I read through the Bible, it didn’t seem to be high on the list of God’s priorities either. The issue is truth. What is true?

  12. @ Tragicmishap

    The ad says this:
    “There’s probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.”

    In what sense is this related to the priority you mention? It conveys (to me at least) that belief in God is restrictive and unnatural, an impediment to enjoyment. What does that have to do with the truth of religion, or the existence of God?

    In the bible, God is referred to as the “happy God.” I don’t feel this is particularly relevant to the point I made though. People find happiness in religion regardless of the priority given to it by Yahweh.

  13. 13
    sagebrush gardener

    Last time I read through the Bible, it didn’t seem to be high on the list of God’s priorities either.

    Your comment intrigued me, so I got out my concordance for a quick overview of God’s feelings on happiness. I looked up the word “rejoice”. From the third book of the Bible, where God commands His people to rejoice (“… ye shall rejoice before the LORD your God …”) to the last book (“Let us be glad and rejoice…”) there is a lot of rejoicing going on! So cheer up a little. :-)

  14. @12

    Point taken. They are trying to make it seem like happiness is increased without religion, which is arguable. What I was trying to say is that our response to that type of childishness is not to say, “Nuh uh, we are happy too.” That’s just as childish. Our message ought to be, “This is true and here’s why.” That’s a stronger case.

    @13

    That’s pretty uncritical. Do studies on words like “sorrow”, “wrath” and “love”. Like evolutionists, you are picking and choosing evidence that supports your hypothesis without considering opposing evidence.

    I do not doubt that quite a few people find happiness in religion. I will maintain though that truth is a higher priority for God than the shifting sands of emotion. It should be for us too.

  15. The ad may just as well have said, “there’s probably no God, and since you’re going to die anyway, just kill yourself already.” That’s no stupider.

  16. I think it should say…

    “There probably is no God… but then again, we probably wouldn’t exist if there wasn’t one.”

  17. beancan5000 – “Is “Haw-Haw” Dawkins implying Brits don’t think so he has to put signs on buses to get them to do so?”

    I have to say I agree that this could be considered offensive to the British public. Yet, how many similar techniques are used in America to persuade the public? Whether or not you agree with the groups displaying the ads, the use of such media to try to persuade a mass audience is clearly propaganda. That doesn’t mean that it carries the same negative connotations of the propaganda of the Nazi campaign, but it does advise caution. These ads present one side of the argument without evidence or logic, and I think we all agree that their credibility is low.

    One section of the article stated that “Sherine came up with the idea after seeing a series of Christian posters on London buses. She said she visited the Web site promoted on one ad and found it told nonbelievers they would spend eternity in torment in hell”. The actual, written message of the website is not shared, which does make me wonder whether or not Sherine was ascribing her own interpretation to the message. However, Christian groups have used their fair share sin and damnation tactics to foster conversions. I think it’s shameful that Christians have resorted to this type of propaganda to promote their own agendas. True Christ followers are love and not judgment focused. Our worldview may be eternally centered, but that doesn’t mean our judgment of those with a post modern worldview is justified.

  18. I think that some serious Christians should get the money together and put up big signs that say…

    “God is judging you every second of your life.”

    That seems like a positive true and just retaliation.

  19. “Thinking is anathema to religion.” – I struggle with this statement. I agree in the respect that some religious traditions do not require or encourage their members to think critically or to question the religious authorities. But on the other hand, there are several Protestant churches that highly urge their members to read and research the Bible on their own time; pastors even assure their members that it is fine to doubt with the assumption that most members that doubt have a stronger faith in the end.

    @ 8 & 10
    “Probably no God.” – Is it really worth the chance? If Atheists are correct, Christians lose nothing. If the Bible is correct, Atheists lose everything. While gaining “fire insurance” should not be a sole reason for salvation in Jesus – it is a valid reason to analyze one’s faith.

    The question should be raised – “How can one have faith in something he or she has created?” It is the same as physically building a wooden statue and saying, “You are now God. You have power.” It is just as effective to give a wooden statue power as it is to put faith in something a human mind created or wished to be true. Truth is truth, no matter the person, culture or belief system. Truth offends and simply put, Jesus is the only way to Heaven.

    It is unfortunate to think that some random person like Ariane Sherine can find something offensive, create something new and sell it to the rest of society as truth, especially with eternity at stake. I understand that this happens often, but it is usually more subtle.

    @ 3
    It is true what you say about finding “enjoyment” in this life. It’s the concept that freedom actually includes rules and guidelines. True freedom is not a life without restrictions, especially in regards to faith in Jesus. The guidelines He sets before us are ultimately to protect us. His rules are not to hinder our enjoyment of life, but rather to promote it. The Bible says He came to give life and to give it abundantly (John 10:10).

  20. “Thinking is anathema to religion.”

    I think I would have to agree with a pretty heavy thinker on this one…

    “Science without religion is lame.”

    -Albert Einstein

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